What is Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP)

Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) has been divided into five stages. Stages 1 and 2 customarily get better on their own. Some eyes, however, go on to Stage 3 retinopathy of prematurity.

This happens when new blood vessels start to grow from the retina toward the center of the eye, forming a ridge between retina that has blood vessels in the back of the eye, and the retina that does not have blood vessels in the front of the eye.

This difference in the blood vessels of the retina is because the premature baby has not had the time while in the womb to allow the blood vessels within the retina to grow all the way from the optic nerve in the back of the eye to the front of the eye.

Stage 3...

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Persistent Fetal Vasculature Syndrome (PFVS)

Persistent fetal vasculature syndrome (PFVS) has replaced the older name of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. The new name is better because it acknowledges that two parts of the fetal vasculature can persist leaving the eye with an opaque lens and vascular stalk of tissue.

One of the changes that the name does not imply is that the retina (the part of the eye that processes light and sends it to the brain) may also be altered either in larger or microscopic amounts called retinal dysplasia.

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Retinoschisis

Congenital X-linked retinoschisis, affecting 1 in 25,000 live births in the United States, is a leading cause of reduced vision and blindness in children. It results in a splitting of the layers of the retina.

The retina is composed of many layers and these cellular layers are held together by a protein “glue” called retinoschisin. It has been thought in the past that congenital X-linked retinoschisis results from abnormally formed retinoschisin.

Recently, a new protein “Tenascin C”contained within the retina itself has been discovered.

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Familial Exudative Vitreoretinopathy (FEVR)

Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy or FEVR is an inherited retinal disease that has varying degrees of severity.  It is categorized as having five stages. Stage 1 often results in no symptoms or visual change for the patient and Stage 5 can result in a blind eye.

The inheritance patterns of FEVR range from autosomal dominant to autosomal recessive and an X-linked inheritance pattern.

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Audio Seminar on ROP

Seminars@Hadley is pleased to present this "Let's Talk" discussion on the unique joys and challenges of raising a child with retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Join the conversation with Paula Korelitz and Jen O'Neill. Paula, an experienced vision...

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